Goundbreaking for two new PPA-Projects in California

01.09.2017
At the ceremony (from left to right): Petaluma Councilmember Dave King, Coldwell Solar's EVP of Construction Kevin Webb, Property Owner Josephine Lavio, Supervisor David Rabbit, and Sonoma Clean Power's CEO Geof Syphers. (Photo: Coldwell Solar / SCP)
At the ceremony (from left to right): Petaluma Councilmember Dave King, Coldwell Solar's EVP of Construction Kevin Webb, Property Owner Josephine Lavio, Supervisor David Rabbit, and Sonoma Clean Power's CEO Geof Syphers. (Photo: Coldwell Solar / SCP)

When solar integrator Coldwell Solar and not-for-profit electricity provider Sonoma Clean Power broke ground for a combined 2 MW of solar energy facility it marked the next step in the journey to a clean energy future for the Californian Sonoma and Mendocino counties. The plant is the first of two new projects that involve PPAs. Under the agreements, Coldwell Solar developed the projects and will build, operate and maintain the solar plants and deliver an agreed-upon amount of solar generated electricity to SCP.

“We look forward to adding 2 MW of local solar to augment the local geothermal currently making up our 100% renewable EverGreen service,” said SCP CEO Geof Syphers. “It’s exciting to be bringing our first local solar project online.”

The projects are part of SCP’s ProFIT (feed-in tariff) program that allows private landowners to lease their land to generate utility-scale solar energy and boost the county’s renewable energy portfolio. Two separate 1 Megawatt systems will be online in rural Petaluma by the end of the year.

“Sonoma and Mendocino counties have been leaders in renewable energy and environmental sustainability for decades,” said Dave Hood, CEO for Coldwell Solar. “We look forward to a long and productive relationship.”

Coldwell Solar / SCP

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