Largest Solar Heating System in Germany to be built

03.05.2019
Acron-Sunmark solar collector field
Acron-Sunmark solar collector field

Preparation for the to-this-date largest solar heating system in Germany has begun in Ludwigsburg, Baden-Württemberg. The system has an annual output of 5,500 MWh and a collector field with a gross area of 14,800 m2 which is nearly twice as much as the currently biggest installation in Germany. Stadtwerke Ludwigsburg-Kornwestheim chose the contractor via a tender which was won by Arcon-Sunmark for the design and construction of the turnkey solar heating system including the technical building which will be fully integrated with existing district heating framework. The design of the technical building makes it fit nicely into the environment of a lizard habitat, and a promenade including a lookout point on the roof of the technique building will attract the public and inform about the green footprint of the system.

The construction of the solar heating system will start as soon as the final permissions are granted and it will be fully operational by the end of this year. The energy produced will be equivalent of 300 average households and contribute with a significant reduction in CO2 emissions. The system is the second large-scale solar heating system that is being built by Arcon-Sunmark in Germany. In 2018 a system was made for Vattenfall in Berlin. Alongside other installations this shows that large-scale solar heating is becoming more common in Germany as part of the heating supply.

“We are honored to have been chosen as partner for developing the largest solar district heating system in Germany. The potential of solar heating as part of the district heating supply in Germany is great from both a community and financial viewpoint. The energy is completely clean, the technology is very reliable, and the price is competitive,” says Thomas Karst, CEO, Arcon-Sunmark.

The solar heating system is part of the “Kommunale Klimaschutz-Modellprojekte” called SolarHeatGrid and supported by the “Nationale Klimaschutz Initiative” initiated by the federal ministry for environment (Bundesministerium für Umwelt, Naturschutz und nukleare Sicherheit). The entire project which consists of this large scale solar heating system, a 2,000 m3 storage tank and the connection of today separate sub-grids, and it is expected to annually reduce emissions by 3,700 tons CO2 which is the same as 1,6 million liters of gasoline or a forest with a size of 470 football fields.

“Thanks to all the parties involved we can now allow the construction of this important district heating project. I am delighted that we by the end of this year will have the largest solar district heating system in Germany,” says Bodo Skaletz, CEO, Stadtwerke Ludwigsburg- Kornwestheim.

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