Record-breaking solar heating project in Silkeborg

14.10.2016
The world’s largest solar heating project so far with 12,436 collectors is planned to start operation at the end of 2016. (Photo: Arcon-Sunmark)
The world’s largest solar heating project so far with 12,436 collectors is planned to start operation at the end of 2016. (Photo: Arcon-Sunmark)

In Denmark the largest solar heating solution in the world is well underway. When finished the 156,694 m2 collector field will produce 80.000 MWh annually.

Arcon-Sunmark is the turnkey supplier of the large-scale solar heating project in Silkeborg, Denmark. The installation has been ordered by the city of Silkeborg and its district heating plant. The construction began in June and now it is becoming evident just how large the solar collector field is with its 12,436 collectors. When completed the annual production will total 80,000 MWh and the installation will be an important contribution to the district heating setup in Silkeborg where it will cover 20% of the yearly demand.

Despite the size and production of the installation in Silkeborg, the system is not supported by a storage tank where surplus energy is stored for later use. The reason for this is that the heat demand of the 90.000 inhabitants is bigger than the production – also in the summer months – which means that the entire production goes directly to the consumers thus eliminating the need for any storage.

”Large-scale solar heating is a very efficient form of energy. In Denmark district heating plays an important role in the overall supply strategy. And in later years we have experienced a steadily increasing stream of enquiries and orders from district heating plants which would like to have large-scale solar heating as one of their energy sources,” says Søren Elisiussen, CEO, Arcon-Sunmark.

Silke Funke / Arcon-Sunmark

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