Prototype of V164-9.5 MW burned out

18.08.2017
The preparations for dismantling the V164-9.5 MW began on 14 August. (Photo: MHI Vestas)
The preparations for dismantling the V164-9.5 MW began on 14 August. (Photo: MHI Vestas)

On 4 August, the prototype of the V164-9.5 MW caught fire at the test field in Østerild, Denmark. The nacelle burned out completely. Experts from MHI Vestas are now investigating the cause.

According to MHI Vestas, the turbine was not connected to the grid when the fire broke out. “It was being started up, so it was during this startup phase when it occurred”, said Michael Morris, External Communication Consultant at MHI Vestas Offshore Wind. No one was inside of or on the turbine at the time of the fire. The fire blazed for three hours. No one was injured.

To determine what caused the fire, MHI Vestas took the turbine down off of the tower on 15 August. “To continue the investigation into the root cause, we needed to examine the nacelle more closely”, Morris said. He was not able to report any new insights yet on 17 August.

The V164-9.5 MW in Østerild had been running since the end of 2016. It had successfully completed the performance curve and load measurements, according to a report published by MHI Vestas for the official launch at the Offshore Wind Energy 2017 in early June in London. The system has been officially available for ordering since that time. MHI Vestas is expecting the 9.5-MW turbine to go into commercial operation in 2020. “The incident will not affect any of our construction or installation timetables”, Morris said.

The V164-9.5 MW is currently the most powerful wind turbine in the world. MHI Vestas has mainly used software updates and minor changes to the gearbox and cooling to achieve the performance increase compared to the V164-8 MW.

Katharina Garus

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