Review_East Africa:Tradition meets modernity

SWE 2014 08

Review East Africa Tradition meets modernity After the coastal states Egypt and Morocco, Ethiopia is Africa’s third largest wind power user. Neighbouring Kenya is also preparing to harness more of the wind. Ancient harvesting methods co-exist with modern sustainable energy technologies in Ethiopia. In the harvesting season, oxen tread grain beneath the wind turbines. Photos (4): Bollinger-Kanne majority state-owned energy utility KenGen, EEPCo manages the whole country’s energy supply and therefore operates all the wind farms. That includes the 34 wind turbines of Adama 1, which have been rotating at a height of around 1,800 m three kilometres from Adama since 2012 with a total capacity of 51 MW. With this wind farm, Ethiopia has overtaken its neighbour Kenya in terms of wind energy in one fell swoop. Last year, another 120 MW was added at the Ashegoda wind farm 775 km north of Addis Ababa, taking the East African country to number three on the continent. In its 2013 market analysis, the German Energy Agency (dena) specified Ethiopia as a future market for onshore wind. Walking through the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa, one notices diesel generators rattling outside of many shops. A photographer has to send customers to his competitor because he has not protected himself against power cuts like many other shop owners. There is no system for back-up power at his shop. The state-owned Ethiopian energy utility EEPCo is located just a few steps away. Unlike Kenya’s largest 10 Sun & Wind Energy 8+9/2014


SWE 2014 08
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