Page 11

SWE 2014 08

Things are happening in Kenya By comparison, with 5.1 MW in the Ngong Hills outside its capital Nairobi, Kenya is a lightweight – in fact, along with South Africa, it is in the “Others” category in the Global Wind Energy Council’s (GWEC) 2013 annual report. Although the six 850 kW Vestas turbines in Ngong went into operation in 2009, it has taken years for KenGen to work on expansion. Plans for extensive use of geothermal energy in the East African Rift Valley take precedence. In the long run, it is not wind but geothermal energy that is to replace hydropower as the top electricity source. In late July 2014, a Spanish consortium made up of Iberdrola and Gamesa completed the installation of 16 Gamesa turbines, each with a capacity of 850 kW, in Ngong. Nearby, TPF-Econoler of Belgium equipped a wind farm with eight 850 kW Vestas turbines. This increases KenGen’s generation capacity in Ngong to 25.5 MW. According to media reports, the inauguration ceremony for both projects is to take place in autumn. General Electric is supplying some 38 turbines of 1.6 MW each for the wind farm on the Kinangop Plateau, which is 2,000 m high and located 60 km northwest of Nairobi. Installation started in May 2014. As local media reported in July, construction has been delayed because of a dispute about compensation Wind Edition for farmland that the Kinangop Wind Farm consortium intends to use. However, GE Renewable Energy’s General Manager Europe Cliff Harris firmly believes that results will be visible in February 2015. Great potential – and high risk The 300 MW wind farm project at Lake Turkana in northwestern Kenya in particular demonstrates that transport logistics and financial risks play a key role when building wind farms – promising wind yields are not the only important factor. Because of lacking grid infrastructure and high costs and risks, the World Bank quit the project in 2012. “We were aware of these concerns,” project head Carlo van Wageningen WIND BLADE SOLUTIONS VISIT SIKA ON STAND 242, HALL B6 FROM SEPTEMBER 23 – 26, 2014 30 MINUTE BLADE REPAIR Sika’s advanced blade repair resins and fast sanding surface fi llers off er cure times from 30 minutes allowing same day repairs to be made. Avoid unnecessary downtime costs by repairing with Sika. Sika – Locally, Globally www.sika.com/wind · Phone: +41 58 436 52 87 Electricity generation and wind energy capacity Kenya Ethiopia Installed electricity generation capacity in MW 1,765 2,268 of which hydropower 816 1,978 of which wind power 5 171 of which geothermal 250 7 of which biomass 26 0 of which off-grid 17 0 of which diesel generators and gas turbines 651 112 Electricity production GWh 8,086 (in 2012/2013) 6,210 (in 2011/2012) Wind power capacity planned by 2015 - 2017 MW 636 854 Wind power capacity planned by 2030 MW 3,000 7,000 Feed-in tariffs for grid-connected wind turbines 11 US$-ct/kWh - Source: Energy Ministries in Kenya and Ethiopia, EEPCo


SWE 2014 08
To see the actual publication please follow the link above