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WINDENERGY HAMBURG 2014 HALL B6, BOOTH 346 +++ N117/3000 AT FULL LOAD +++ DAILY OUTPUT: 70.6 MWH +++ READY TO TAKE ON INTERNATIONAL CHALLENGES +++ MEET US AT 6 December 2013 – not in theory, but in Janneby, northern Germany. The N117/3000 is proving a strong performer in the fi eld – with a daily output (24 hrs) of 70.6 MWh. Just one day out of many. One of three Generation Delta turbine types, ready to take on international challenges. The fi rst large projects are already under construction and the N131/3000 light-wind turbine now completes the Generation Delta platform. www.nordex-online.com/delta project phases. “Our company and Dongfang of China will install 120 MW each,“ explains Senior Advisor Stephan Willms of Lafto Turbine Technologies, a German company based in Addis Ababa, adding that the local technology company METEC will be in charge of the remaining 60 MW. According to press reports, the Chinese Export-Import Bank EXIM, which was already part of the Adama deal, is named as a lender for a project phase. The parties that will be involved on the European side are still being discussed. After Adama and Ashegoda, the port of Djibouti has experience loading large wind turbines, which should make it easier to handle equipment for Aysha. In addition, roads and power transmission lines are already available. For Ashegoda wind farm about 750 km needed to be covered on the road for Vergnet’s 30 GEV HP two-bladers with 1 MW of capacity each and the 54 Alstom ECO74 three-bladers with 1.67 MW each. As of the end of May 2014, almost all wind turbines of the wind farm are in regular operation, according to information from German project specialist Lahmeyer. By 2030, Kenya and Ethiopia intend to increase power generation capacity by more than tenfold in order to make their vision of becoming emerging markets come true. While Kenya expects 3,000 MW of wind energy capacity to be built, amounting to a share of about 15 % in the generation mix, figures in Ethiopia reach up to 7,000 MW, which would raise the share of wind power capacity to more than 30 %. Wind farms already rank second behind hydropower plants. While the envisaged rise to more than 800 MW by late 2015 may seem to be an expression of very ambitious aspirations, doubling the wind power capacity within the next two years seems to be quite realistic. This would be quite in line with logistics experience, advances in installation and promising project financing negotiations. In Kenya, the extent to which Turkana will be completed by the end of 2016, or how projects such as Kipeto (on the coast) and Isiolo will do with their 100 MW each, is as yet unknown. In order to attract more investors to the country and implement large projects, Ethiopia’s government will have no choice but to approve independent generation companies, in addition to EEPCo, and establish an energy market. Josephine Bollinger-Kanne Wind Edition 13


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