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Wind Edition Offshore Training and Development Cluster The Centre for the Wind Industry Training at one location in accordance with international standards, and adapted to the needs of our customers. } GWO Basic Safety Training } Maritime safety training (HUET, boat landing etc.) } Helicopter rescue training on real offshore wind turbines } Wind energy specific technology and safety training } Training as wind turbine service technician GWO, ISO 9001 and ISO 29990 accredited OffTEC Base GmbH & Co. KG Lecker Straße 7 25917 Enge-Sande, Germany Tel: +49 4662 89 127 -0 eMail info@offtec.de www.offtec.de for specialised professionals in the wind energy industry. This is particularly true for the European offshore wind market. “Up to now, although the UK has no manufacturers or a large industry of its own, what it does have is a lot of experience in the construction and operation of offshore wind farms,” says Wim Keen, a managing partner and energy consultant at Antal International. He helps his customers keep an eye out for suitable staff. “Specialists are needed in all phases. This ranges from planning to site surveys, to construction. In these areas, in particular, many specialists come from Belgium, Holland and England,” he says. And this is precisely where English companies can show their good cards. “There were just a lot of wind farms built offshore all around England. So, of course, there is a correspondingly high level of experience here.” Chris Streatfeild, the Director of Health & Safety at the industry association RenewableUK also sees this as a trump card. But he does not necessarily want to shout it from the rooftops. “Basically, from the oil and gas business, we have a long maritime tradition and the UK is the largest market for offshore wind energy,” he says. The result is that even before the GWO standard came along, the English had already made considerable strides in terms of HSE. The national skills of the Offshore Petroleum Industry Training Organisation (OPITO) are among the world’s best training standards for safer work at sea. All of its courses, certificates and training programmes completed by employees are stored on a special chip card. Technicians simply hold the card in front of a scanner located at a port or helicopter terminal and are cleared to work at a maritime construction site. Streatfeild is striving for something similar in the wind industry. “We’re working with the key companies from the wind industry toward a verification system and want to consider what kind of details could be stored on such a card starting in October. This is still an on-going process,” he says. Just as important as safety, however, is the content of the training for service technicians. In that regard, the Training Centre for Renewable Energy (BZEE) has done real pioneering work in Husum, Schleswig Holstein. The largest European and North American wind associations are part of the academy’s network. Together with local partners, the BZEE has already established skills training in Canada, the USA and several European countries. Just recently six new training centres have opened in France. “The demand for personnel in the wind industry is on the rise in Europe. At the same time it is difficult to find qualified electricians or mechatronics specialists. In countries, such as France, the unemployed are trained and after several months of courses get a second chance. In Germany it is becoming increasingly difficult to get enough participants due to the good economic climate and the increasingly stringent requirements of the employment offices,” says Beate Buhl of the BZEE. Torsten Thomas GLOBAL LEADER IN FALL PROTECTION VISIT US AT WIND ENERGY HAMBURG STAND NUMBER: B7.545 00 800 999 55500 +49 (0) 2 76 18 33 82 29 WWW.CAPITALSAFETY.COM DATE: 23rd–26th September 2014 Entry to the exhibition is free, simply register at: www.windenergyhamburg.com 11565 CS Wind Energy Show Advert_Multi_AW.indd 1 28/08/2014 17:19


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