Editorial

SWE 2014 08

Editorial Chemicals in Wind Industry The only constant is change – it is a bromide, but it does not take decades of experience in the wind industry to see the truth in that statement. When exhibitors and visitors make their way to Hamburg for WindEnergy in September, the adage will be confirmed yet again. Hamburg has embraced internationalism with the good infrastructure of a large city. Once the trade fair week has passed, we will see whether the port city has managed to make guests from around the world feel as at home at the trade fair as they used to in Husum for more than 20 years. After all, a good mood encourages good business. One thing is clear already, however: just as the most important wind event has had to re-invent itself, so too must the wind industry continuously redefine its identity. For suppliers and manufacturers, it has been a matter of using new concepts and materials to reduce turbine production and operating costs, further increase their availability, as well as simplify and reduce service and maintenance costs. Ultimately, operators do not want turbines that are especially cheap, and later prove to be expensive to maintain while producing only mediocre yields. What they want are precisely those turbines that offer the best value for their location over their entire service life. This is exactly where new materials come in. They are easier to work with, lighter in weight, have a longer service life, and a lower cost. Such a broad range of demands have been required in other fields of mechanical engineering in the past, and have been implemented successfully. The chemical industry has played a key role in these successes. It has developed and optimised composites for the aerospace industry, for instance. The experience amassed in that industry can help to make wind turbines more economical today. By optimising the production and processing of components and simplifying maintenance and repair, they further reduce the cost of wind generated electricity. But the whole range of available composites and coatings is still a technological terra nova for many applications in the wind industry. With decades of editorial expertise in wind energy of both our sister magazine SONNE WIND & WÄRME and of SUN & WIND ENERGY, this is where our new trade magazine Chemicals in Wind Industry comes in to build a bridge between the chemicals and wind industries. Manufacturers and suppliers, as well as service and maintenance personnel who read CiWI – an in-house designation of our new publication for the offshore wind industry and a nod to OWI – get up-to-the-minute expert information on chemical-based materials, their characteristics and processing techniques – and with a special focus on their potential uses in the wind industry. CiWI will celebrate its premiere at WindEnergy Hamburg. Trade fair visitors can pick up a copy of the first issue at our stand in Hall B4, Booth EG 201. Visitors can meet with members of the editorial staff of CiWI between 4 and 6 p.m. in the media centre. And, of course, anybody can subscribe to CiWI – if you do so before 1 November, you even get an introductory 20% discount. All it takes is an e-mail to service@sunwindenergy.com (details on our ad at page 50). See you in Hamburg! Dr. Volker Buddensiek Editor-in-chief volker.buddensiek@sunwindenergy.com Wind Edition 3


SWE 2014 08
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