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Wind Energy Henkel will be showing GL-certified adhesive technology for the production of rotor blades as well as sealing and lubricant technologies in Hamburg. The basis of the range of adhesives carrying the brand name Loctite is polyurethane technology (PUR). The new adhesives offer a range of benefits: they can reduce the energy consumption required in rotor blade gluing, shorten the manufacturing time and therefore reduce overall costs. Due to their ability to harden completely at room temperature, they provide maximum process safety and automation potential, especially in the adhesion of smaller components or in difficult to-access locations. This allows the hardening and therefore the production speed to be controlled by varying the amount of heat added. A rule of thumb is that a temperature increase of 10 °C reduces the hardening time by half. Hall B7, Booth 618 Various joins where adhesive is used can be seen on this rotor blade cross-section. Graphic: Henkel In close co-operation with leading companies in the wind energy industry, Mink Bürsten has developed sealing concepts that use brushes. Thanks to their flexibility and the numerous fibres that work selectively, brushes differ considerably from material such as rubber or foam. The system can be reliably shielded from seawater climate influences and condensation moisture discharge can be implemented at the same time. The brush body in the Mink Flex system consists of flexible, hard-wearing and high quality thermoplastic rubber that is both UV and ozone-resistant, and also robust against chemical and thermal influences. The fire protection class UL94 HB has been confirmed (V0 possible). The polyester fibre material possesses outstanding characteristics for both the offshore and onshore industries. At a water absorption rate of > 0.3 %, high mechanical stress resistance as well as high inherent stiffness, the material ensures that its sealing function is carried out even with major dimensional tolerances. Hall B5, Booth 322 Mink brushes allow different parts of a wind turbine to be sealed off. Graphic: Mink TimberTower GmbH is presenting its wooden towers for large wind turbines in Hamburg. The models on display as well as the furniture at the trade fair booth are made of the same material as the TimberTower itself. The company was founded in 2008, and the first 100 m high prototype has been in operation in Hanover since 2012. The year 2014 will be remembered for the next stage of innovation: the approval of a 140 m high TimberTower. The product and the coming project are unique worldwide, and the sophisticated process that allows the renewable raw material wood to be arranged and processed so that even 2.5 MW wind turbines can be safely positioned at the tip of the tower is truly impressive. Hall A1, Booth 408 TimberTower’s trade fair furniture and wind energy tower are made of the same material: wood. Photo: TimberTower A new rotor blade traverse (RBT), the ‘Bunny’ version, for single blade installation on wind turbines that are not equipped with transmissions will be presented by ematec AG. Bunny can be inclined by up to 35° to the horizontal. No auxiliary motor needs to be used to rotate the hub when attaching the second and third rotor blades during its deployment. Bunny can grip rotor blades at any angle of rotation. The blades can be picked up directly from a trailer or from the ground. They are held by multi-joint gripping arms and large-area rubberised pressure plates; the positive-locking blade safety system is secured using an encompassing holding claw. By further development of the gripper technology, the risk of damage to the rotor blades has been eliminated, according to Manfred Eberhard, CEO at ematec. “We have achieved smoother power graduation through a range of adaptations,” he says. Thanks to the transition to a hollow body structure, weight savings of up to 30 % have been achieved, and the traverses can be transported using a low loader with a standard permanent certificate of exemption. Hall 1, Booth 104 32 Sun & Wind Energy 8+9/2014


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