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Wind Energy Logistics correspondingly few towns to pass through or other bottlenecks, which could only be negotiated at a walking pace or by increasing road clearance. The long transport time was enough to eliminate the option of transport by ship. A further disadvantage was the relatively expensive loading and securing tackle required for safety reasons, when such goods are transported by sea. When the stand for transporting the blades by ship is compared with the stand used for rail transport, the cost advantage of the pragmatic Chinese solution becomes obvious. Apart from the purely technical handling issues, an administrative hurdle remains which, says Ritschel, can only be negotiated with a local partner. “The local freight forwarder took care of many formalities for us,” he says. “It also purchased the loading and unloading infrastructure – perhaps this is too big a word to describe the crane that was ordered.” Vestas lowers costs and emissions FWT Executive Henning Zint considers this transport a pioneering achievement for the industry. “This was uncharted territory for us,” he emphasises. “We had no proven solutions.” For this reason the Chinese forwarding agent, which procured the long transport railcars, carried out some of its own tests on the fastening elements prior to the final dispatch. The FWT transport was without doubt a pioneering achievement. It is not, however, the first The crane does not have a hard time of it. The rotor blades weigh in at nine tonnes. Utmost concentration is needed during loading, however, to avoid damage. Only the last few kilometres to the construction site have to be covered by trucks. 40 Sun & Wind Energy 8+9/2014


SWE 2014 08
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